The success of tiny house movement sparks regulation debate in some states

Living in a tiny house seems like a simple solution for families trying to pinch pennies, but the movement has sparked some debate in Tennessee and other states. Much of the concern for these homes comes from local zoning departments, according to WJHL
"Our zoning codes are designed to address RVs and mobile homes and the tiny house kind of falls in between there," Washington County Planner and Development Administrator, Jordan Clark, told WJHL. 
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Clark told reporters that these homes may not meet building codes and certifications and that the county isn't interested in allowing the homes to become permanent solutions. 
Clark also noted that the homes are too small for minimum square footage requirements on some land. The classification of the home (mobile, stick-build, modular etc.) have individual zoning regulations and tiny homes aren't specifically addressed in current laws, which makes it difficult to get building permits. 
Clark noted that the county is currently discussing whether or not to allow tiny homes, but admitted that there is pressure from people who want to try their hand at this type of living. 
Tennessee isn't the only state tackling the small home debate. Massachusetts recently turned down a bill that would allow small homes in the state, forcing one woman out of her house, according to WJHL. 
Other states like Oregon, Texas, California, North Carolina, and Florida are very tiny house friendly, according to EcoBuilding Pulse. Tiny Homes are defined as living spaces under 600-square feet. 
One owner of a tiny home recommends that people interested in living in a tiny home, purchase land first. 
"On the TV shows, you see that people are pulling into their friends or family's backyard. There's not anything addressed about trying to find land for it. So, I think searching for land should be the first thing and then have your tiny house built. Find your land, because it's going to take quite a while," Tammy Backlund told WJHL. 
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Resources WJHL and Eco Building Pulse
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