This tiny house couple are on a giant journey

When it comes to tiny houses, the traveling couple Jenna Spesard and Guillaume Dutilh are consummate pros. Not only do they live in a tiny house, but they frequently tow it behind their extended-cab truck with a determined sense of adventure. They also attend tiny house gatherings, visit tiny house villages and write about them, practicing travel journalism along the way. In addition, they take seriously fun snapshots of their travels, while managing a witty Web site called “Tiny House, Giant Journey.”
The photos speak volumes. The couple, by appearances, live a free and easy existence that is in constant motion -- making trips to Europe, South America and other ports of call. But their tiny house lifestyle is also a statement. If tiny house living means jettisoning your greed for stuff, then how much freedom does that allow? The couple with their bright-eyed pet dog Salies seem like they are on the road to figure that question out. Let's see if their cozy home, which they built themselves, allows for that.
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Spesard and Dutilh have posted dozens of pictures of their house in tow, chronicling their giant journey from mountains to cities, from shorelines to prairies. The one with the lighthouse is labeled Peggy's Cove, which is part of Margaret's Bay in Novia Scotia, Canada. 
The couple enjoy posting photos of their tiny house near tourist attractions that show the relative size of their home.  The photo below shows the house parked in front of a giant ax that appears to be sunk into the roof. ("The world's biggest ax," says the caption, making it easy to find. It's in Nackawic, New Brunswick, Canada.)
The interior shows a home designed for comfort, not for speed. It also shows the couple believes in keeping musical instruments and snowboards within reach. Here are a few interior shots.
The downstairs shelving is rough, but very affordable. The key element, of course, is the handrail above the shelves on the wall. That's right, the shelves are also a staircase to the bedroom loft. (The short barrel at the bottom of the steps is also a step.)
This sitting area offers a private nook for reading or watching the world go by. And here's a trick you might not have noticed: The door is decidedly thinner than most doors, allowing for a more interesting look to the house and saving a few precious inches of indoor space.
There are homey touches throughout this home, such as the curtains for shade or privacy. The bright ceiling gives the room added brightness, accented by the center beam.
The bedroom also displays the benefit of having two dormers on this tiny house. The expanded height to the bedroom ceiling and a place for those four windows helps a lot.
The split shot of the bathroom makes it appear twice as big as it really is. Still, this bathroom appears to serve its purposes well enough.
Who needs four burners in the kitchen, anyway? This three-burner stove is set into a single, wide plank that has a rough-hewn edge facing the center of the room. This at-home-with-nature style is consisted throughout this tiny house that also features exposed beams and natural wood colors.
More thought goes into tiny house ceilings than you might believe. This tiny house has two dormers, which makes for a greatly enlarged bedroom loft. On the other side, there's a skylight seen here on the right and a snowboard rack on the left -- which tells you a lot about the owners' priorities. The extra loft could be packed with stuff, but it looks available, instead, as a guest bedroom. The round window is also a highlight.
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