Take a tour of the 'Blueberry' tiny home with us

Not only are living in tiny homes a movement, but actually doing the work and building them yourselves seems to be the approach many of the owners of the more intriguing designs are taking. It's not hard to see why taking the craftsmanship into your own hands is appealing – space is limited so you want something functional for your exact needs.
Over the course of a year Laura and Rory saw their dream of living in a tiny home come to fruition at the end of their own hammers. The couple built the 'blueberry' themselves, incorporating unique features that they deem a priority into the interior with an exterior they found stylish.
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One of the couple's priorities was a seating area where guests could face each other. Their version of a great room features a good mix of natural light and comfortable relaxation space. You'll also see that it's very multi-functional.
Not only does the great room table flip down for increased space, the one person chair actually folds out to seat two extra people. The extension rests nicely on the stairs heading to the loft and a support block fits conveniently underneath the first step. It takes a little effort to convert the chair but nothing that fold-out sofa owners haven't dealt with before.
Looking out towards the other side of the great room shows the couple's office/furnace area tucked into a corner nook. The table folds up to set a computer or paperwork on and the 8.000 BTU furnace keeps your toes warm while Googling the newest tiny home innovations.
Another reason the furnace is so aptly located in that particular corner because Laura and Rory's little blue Vancouver tiny home also has a clothesline in their great room. This neat retractable line features three strings for drying their clothes – saving tons of space compared to a washer/dryer combo. Part of living in a tiny home is making use of every available space.
A storage loft sits above the great room and like other tiny homes it can be also used as a secondary loft if needed. At the time of the tour the couple themselves had only been living in the “Loraboraliasis” a little over four months so they weren't quite ready for sleepovers just yet.
The Gambrel style of the roof not only gives the home a unique contour when looking from the exterior, it also shapes their loft rather nicely on the interior. The couple built in a skylight for natural light but also made sure to frame in a unit that opens to increase ventilation. Coupled with a fan at the front of the storage loft they say humidity and moisture hasn't been a problem.
Interestingly the couple noted that the tiny sink was one of the hardest objects to source and more expensive than you might imagine. When installed though it really becomes a focal point of the bathroom and was worth the time and money investment.
The kitchen sink features a concrete countertop which adds 200 pounds to the towing weight of the tiny home. Part of the reason for implementing this however was the fact that the homeowner was a former mason worker and he had the skill to construct the countertop exactly how he wanted. Another mantra of tiny home self-building, you do what you know.
Laura & Rory's Blueberry Tiny House taught many lessons about the possibilities that two people with relatively amateur DIY skills could accomplish with passion, patience, creativity, and as they admitted, “the help of some YouTube videos.” Another thought provoking issue they brought up was that living in a tiny house doesn't mean leaving your possessions behind or packed up in a storage shed, just being more intuitive with how they are in your life. The stained-glass fish on the front door for example was a gift from Rory's grandfather 20+ years ago. It was pressed into a double-glazed window and now serves as a greeting to all guests who enter their abode to share 'fish tales'.
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