8 friends built their own tiny neighborhood. Look inside and you'll want to move

Sustainable. Small. Steel. There are no better words to describe the compound near Llano, Texas, and the Llano River that has been dubbed Bestie Row.
Bestie Row was commissioned by Fred and Judi Zipp. The real name of the compound is Llano Exit Strategy. The property was designed by the Zipps' longtime friend, architect Matt Garcia, according to May 2015 People magazine story. People are calling the property Bestie Row because that’s where the Zipps and three other couples plan to retire eventually.
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The Zipps told Garcia they wanted a new home that was sustainable, energy efficient and took advantage of the natural features that the property offered. Garcia drew on his childhood to come up with the design for the compound. 
The compound is comprised of four 350-square-foot cabins and a 1,500-square-foot common area for entertaining. The kitchen in the common area has a large, spacious, chef-quality cooking range. It also has a large, spacious refrigerator. 
The kitchen is separated from the dining area by a black island. The dining area has enough room for large crowds. The building also has a large, spacious living room. 
Off to the side, there is a guest room that has bunk beds made from natural wood. It is separated from the common area by sliding doors. The outside of the cabins are covered in corrugated steel. They have butterfly roofs that collect rainwater that is stored in a cistern and used to irrigate the property.  
“This is a magical place, but it’s arid,” Fred Zipp said to Garden and Gun. “We’re doing what we can to reserve as much water as possible for the native trees and grasses. Fortunately, they’re beautiful.” 
The inside of the cabins feature concrete floors and spray foam insulation that keeps the cabins cool when it is hot outside and warm when it is cold. 
“We just wanted something warm feeling that would offset the coolness of the metal on the outside,” Garcia said to Garden and Gun of the use of concrete. “It’s a high-design finish that doesn’t cost a lot of money.” 
The cabins themselves feature amenities such as a sitting area, bed and a bookshelf.
The Zipps and their friends haven’t moved into their cabins yet. Right now they only vacation there. The property is also available for others to rent on Airbnb for $1,050 a night. 
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